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Postdoc Position in Functional and Constraint Programmingat KU Leuven

General haskell list - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 9:14am
Postdoctoral position in Functional and Constraint Programming at KU Leuven The Declarative Languages and Artificial Intelligence (DTAI) group of KU Leuven (Belgium) invites applicants for a postdoctoral position in the area of functional and constraint programming. The position revolves around domain-specific languages (DSLs) embedded in Haskell for constraint programming. It is part of the EU project GRACeFUL whose overarching theme is tools for collective decision making. The KU Leuven part of the project is under the direction of prof. Tom Schrijvers. To apply you must hold a recent PhD (or be about to graduate) related to either functional or constraint programming. Experience in both areas is an advantage. You will work closely with prof. Schrijvers and his PhD students at KU Leuven, as well as with the GRACeFUL project partners across Europe. The position is for 3 years. The salary is competitive and the starting date negotiable (but no later than February 1). Moreover, KU Leuven's policy of equal
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criterion

del.icio.us/haskell - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 5:34am
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Tom Schrijvers: Postdoc Position in Functional and Constraint Programming

Planet Haskell - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 2:08am
Postdoctoral position in Functional and Constraint Programming at KU LeuvenThe Declarative Languages and Artificial Intelligence (DTAI) group of KU Leuven (Belgium) invites applicants for a postdoctoral position in the area of functional and constraint programming. The position revolves around domain-specific languages (DSLs) embedded in Haskell for constraint programming. It is part of the EU project GRACeFUL whose overarching theme is tools for collective decision making. The KU Leuven part of the project is under the direction of prof. Tom Schrijvers.

To apply you must hold a recent PhD (or be about to graduate) related to either functional or constraint programming. Experience in both areas is an advantage.

You will work closely with prof. Schrijvers and his PhD students at KU Leuven, as well as with the GRACeFUL project partners across Europe.

The position is for 3 years. The salary is competitive and the starting date negotiable (but no later than February 1). Moreover, KU Leuven's policy of equal opportunities and diversity applies to this position.

Application procedure: http://people.cs.kuleuven.be/~tom.schrijvers/postdocposition2.html
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Simple Haskell IRC client in "two lines of code"

Haskell on Reddit - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 2:02am

(excluding import lines):

import Pipes import Pipes.Network.TCP import qualified Pipes.ByteString as PBS import Control.Concurrent main = withSocketsDo $ connect "irc.freenode.net" "6667" $ \(s, _) -> forkIO (runEffect $ PBS.stdin >-> toSocket s) >> runEffect (fromSocket s 4096 >-> PBS.stdout) submitted by kvanberendonck
[link] [62 comments]
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How to send a string somewhere via UDP

haskell-cafe - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 12:19am
Chapter 27 of Real World Haskell <http://book.realworldhaskell.org/read/sockets-and-syslog.html> explains a way to send a message over UDP. From a folder containing the two files "syslogclient.hs" and "SyslogTypes.hs" (which are attached to this email, and also available here <http://book.realworldhaskell.org/read/sockets-and-syslog.html>), supposedly one can run these three commands from GHCI, to send the message "This is my message" to localhost, port number 514: :load syslogclient.hs h <- openlog "localhost" "514" "testprog" syslog h USER INFO "This is my message" I have a Max/MSP patch that accepts UDP on localhost port number 9000. I substitute 514 -> 9000 and run that, and I get nothing. I know the Max/MSP "udpreceive" object is working, because from Python, using the aiosc module, I can run aiosc.send(('127.0.0.1', 9000), "This is a message from Python") ) and "This is a message from Python" reaches Max. There is a UDP library <http://hackage.haskell.org/package/network-conduit-0.6.1.1/docs/Data-
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Utility of dependent types?

Haskell on Reddit - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 10:34pm

In trying to read up on dependent types, i've often read that they give us much more power than we would otherwise have. However, usually the only example provided is a vector whose length is part of its type. This is certainly useful[1], but surely not the only possible example of the power and utility of DTs.

What are some other day-to-day issues in programming, or mathematics, addressed by dependent types?

[1] And, i feel, certainly more illustrative than the (imo) ridiculous overuse of the fib function as an example of what programming in a given language is like.

submitted by flexibeast
[link] [27 comments]
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GPU Programming in Haskell

del.icio.us/haskell - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 9:06pm
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GPU Programming in Haskell

del.icio.us/haskell - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 9:06pm
Categories: Offsite Blogs

wren gayle romano: Upcoming talk

Planet Haskell - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 8:39pm

For all you local folks, I'll be giving a talk about my dissertation on November 5th at 4:00–5:00 in Ballantine Hall 011. For those who've heard me give talks about it before, not much has changed since NLCS 2013. But the majority of current CL/NLP, PL, and logic folks haven't seen the talk, so do feel free to stop by.

Abstract: Many natural languages allow scrambling of constituents, or so-called "free word order". However, most syntactic formalisms are designed for English first and foremost. They assume that word order is rigidly fixed, and consequently these formalisms cannot handle languages like Latin, German, Russian, or Japanese. In this talk I introduce a new calculus —the chiastic lambda-calculus— which allows us to capture both the freedoms and the restrictions of constituent scrambling in Japanese. In addition to capturing these syntactic facts about free word order, the chiastic lambda-calculus also captures semantic issues that arise in Japanese verbal morphology. Moreover, chiastic lambda-calculus can be used to capture numerous non-linguistic phenomena, such as: justifying notational shorthands in category theory, providing a strong type theory for programming languages with keyword-arguments, and exploring metatheoretical issues around the duality between procedures and values.



comments
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A beginner Haskell project suggestions.

Haskell on Reddit - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 8:37pm

I recently picked up haskell and started learning it using learnyouahaskell.com I am really enjoying it so far. But tutorials don't challenge me to come up with solutions or really think about problems in this weird language. and so I want to make something using haskell, just a smallish hobby project. But I can't come up with anything interesting that I want to make. And so I was looking for suggestions.

I want something that is challenging, but not something impossible for someone fairly new to haskell. It doesn't have to be original or anything, I just want something interesting.

thanks!

submitted by Minkzilla
[link] [12 comments]
Categories: Incoming News

ANN: Haskell plugin for IntelliJ

haskell-cafe - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 3:37pm
Hi everyone, I'm glad to announce initial version of Haskell plugin for IntelliJ. It's available in the plugin repository. This plugin is written mainly in Scala and is not mentioned to support GHC/Cabal directly. This plugin support sandbox projects and expects that the Cabal init/install/build is done on command-line. Features - Syntax highlighting (which can be customised); - Error/warning highlighting; - Find Usages of identifiers; - Resolving references of identifiers (also to library code if library source code is added to project and resolves inside import declaration); - Code completion by resolving references; - Renaming variables (which first shows preview so refactoring scope can be adjusted); - View type info from (selected) expression; - View expression info; - View quick documentation; - View quick definition; - Structure view; - Navigate to declaration (called `Class` in IntelliJ menu); - Navigate to identifier (called `Symbol` in IntelliJ menu); - Code completion by looking to import dec
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GPU Programming in Haskell

del.icio.us/haskell - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 3:22pm
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Dynamic only GHC

glasgow-user - Mon, 10/20/2014 - 1:53pm
I'm trying to build a minimal GHC 7.8.3 on Debian Wheezy with only dynamic libraries (this is for a system where disc space is scarce). I'm using this build.mk: GhcRTSWays = thr GhcLibWays = dyn HADDOCK_DOCS = NO DYNAMIC_BY_DEFAULT = YES GhcDynamic = YES Tried with and without GhcDynamic (asked on beginners how it's different to DYNAMIC_GHC_PROGRAMS but still waiting for an answer). It gets near the end of the build, then fails with: HC [stage 1] ghc/stage2/build/Main.dyn_o HC [stage 1] ghc/stage2/build/tmp/ghc-stage2 /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lHSrts_thr-ghc7.8.3 collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status make[1]: *** [ghc/stage2/build/tmp/ghc-stage2] Error 1 make: *** [all] Error 2 If I build with only static libraries, everything seems to work OK.
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