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Philip Wadler: Status report

Planet Haskell - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 4:33am
I am off work this semester, being treated for two things: an infection affecting my heart and abdomen; and a tumour on my kidney. I was in hospital 17 Dec—2 Jan, and self-administered antibiotics as an outpatient 3 Jan—29 Jan. The photo shows me partway through self-administration, which required 90 minutes each day.

The infection of my heart and abdomen appears cured, and I am feeling much better. I am awaiting an appointment with urology. It is likely the kidney will need to be removed. The tumour, I am told, is too small to have metastasised. I will have better information once I meet my urologist, but my current guess is that I will be back at work sometime in March.

My thanks to the NHS and to the Western General Hospital for the excellent treatment I have received, and to all my colleagues for their support.
Categories: Offsite Blogs

ghci on ARM m3?

haskell-cafe - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 4:18am
Lately, I've not been doing much Haskell because I've buried in embedded systems work. The code is all C, with only a smidgen of C++ (for which I am grateful). One of the things I've been toying with is turning part of the on-chip configuration information a haskel functions. They'd even be pure code, and would be a lot more expressive than what's there now. The target platforms are running Cortex M3 CPUs. I know that jhc/ajhc will generate code for those CPUs, but I really need at least a subset of the compiler running on the target processor with no pre-installed RTOS. Has that been done? Is it likely to even be possible? As part of the project, I'll need to install both a cross-compiler on my Unix box, and the the compiler (or parts of it) on the M3. Can someone provide pointers to tutorials on that? My google-foo wasn't powerful enough to find any. I'm thinking about using either an Aruino Due (as it has the M3 CPU on it) as a testbed platform. So tutorials targeted for that platform would be particu
Categories: Offsite Discussion

Haskell in 5 steps - HaskellWiki

del.icio.us/haskell - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 3:53am
Categories: Offsite Blogs

Haskell in 5 steps - HaskellWiki

del.icio.us/haskell - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 3:53am
Categories: Offsite Blogs

Home | Fugue

del.icio.us/haskell - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 2:40am
Categories: Offsite Blogs

Home | Fugue

del.icio.us/haskell - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 2:40am
Categories: Offsite Blogs

ANNOUNCE: UISF Release

haskell-cafe - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 1:12am
I'm happy to announce the release of UISF on Hackage! http://hackage.haskell.org/package/UISF UISF provides an arrowized FRP library for graphical user interfaces. It stems from work done on Euterpea (http://haskell.cs.yale.edu/euterpea/), and is built atop GLFW. One of the neat things about UISF is how it behaves with ArrowChoice. Specifically, one can create dynamic arrows so long as they are *predictably* dynamic. This means that it is possible to have widgets activate, deactivate, and even replicate without resorting to switch. If you're interested in playing around with it, feel free to take a look at the example files, some of which are pretty well documented (note that there are more than just the two displayed on the hackage page). Do let us know about comments you have and bugs you find. -Daniel _______________________________________________ Haskell-Cafe mailing list Haskell-Cafe< at >haskell.org http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Categories: Offsite Discussion

ANNOUNCE: bash script for haskell

haskell-cafe - Fri, 02/06/2015 - 1:07am
I'm sure variations of this exist, but for some reason I didn't find any while searching, so I made my own. The idea is for using haskell on the command line instead of perl or awk etc. https://github.com/jimcrayne/hk _______________________________________________ Haskell-Cafe mailing list Haskell-Cafe< at >haskell.org http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Categories: Offsite Discussion

Complex Event Processing in Haskell

haskell-cafe - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 8:11pm
I'm looking for examples of production-capable Complex Event Processing systems in Haskell along the lines of Esper: http://esper.codehaus.org/ I know of Nettle (and McNettle and Procera) from Yale, and it claims to have excellent performance. http://haskell.cs.yale.edu/nettle/ Is there anything else? Is there anything in another functional language I should look at? I know FRP systems in general deal with processing events, but I am looking specifically for things similar to Esper. Tom
Categories: Offsite Discussion